The Bethel Logo

On February 17, 2013, Bethel adopted our current logo. For information on its significance, check out the following video, or keep reading below!

 

 

Bethel Church Logo

Our logo represents three spheres of Christian living:

  1. Growth (green, inward) reflects our core strengths of Biblical preaching and the development of our children.
  2. Worship (blue, upward) illustrates our dedication to be a Church guided by the glorification of God rather than man.
  3. Relationship (red, outward) reminds us that our faith must be lived out in love, both in small group relationships within Bethel as well as in the proclamation and demonstration of God’s love to the outside world.

Our logo signifies unity

  1. The logo is formed by the intersection of “Borromean Rings,” which have been used historically to represent the Trinity. Three Borromean Rings are not tied to each other, yet are inextricably together. Remove any one ring and the other two fall apart.
  2. We as believers cannot remove any of the three spheres of Christian living. Removing Worship leads to humanism, removing relationship leads to religious pride and legalism, and removing growth in truth leads to heresy.

Our logo reminds us of our ties to historical Christianity

  1. The history of using rings to depict the Trinity dates back at least to Augustine in the 4th century AD. The logo itself is a variation of the “Trefoil Knot”, which became common in Christian iconography as a depiction of the Trinity during the 12th century AD.
  2. We are not innovators in doctrine. Our foundation is God’s unchanging Word, and we are not in the business of “updating” our beliefs to match cultural trends.

Our logo reflects our current context

  1. The logo is made from lines and curves that are current with modern design. While our source for Truth does not change, our means of communicating the Gospel fits the culture we live in.
  2. The shape of the curves and letters is evocative of Bethel’s architecture. In that way it carries a connection to our visible presence in North Platte.